Art Walk

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Date & Time

 April 29, 2019

5 pm – 9 pm

Downtown Ryan St. 

  \We are participating—again—in the Spring Art Walk downtown.

The group will have a table where we will hand out cards and Gator Bites and peddle the anthologies. Group Promoting. 

If group members want to sell their own wares, we can share, but you have to be there with your stuff. The group is responsible only for group merchandise.

Last year it was tons of fun. We got to mix and mingle, meet fellow creatives, watch fire tossing and participate in sword fights. Good Times!


We will be sending out more info soon but basically you show up, set up the table, hang out and talk to folks. 


Find out more

 

Bayou Writers Project

Bayou Writers Project 2019

  

Two years ago Beth Savoie and Cory Conner, drunk on the success of writing a 50,000 word during the month of November, (or maybe shell-shocked) decided if the world can do it, so can Bayou Writers Group. And so, BayouWriMos was born. 


Ok, so maybe they didn’t actually finish their novels, but a lot of words got written and a lot of coffee was imbibed. But, the idea for this challenge is based on NaNoWriMo. Check it out here –www.nanowrimo.org.  


In 2019, the name was changed to further explain the project’s goals. (and hopefully keep NaNoWriMo from having issue with us borrowing their name)


The Project: Is whatever project you’re working on. A novel? A children’s book? A short story for the anthology? A poem for Gator Bites? (hint, hint) Progress on your current project. Whatever you want to get done in April, May, and June and need the accountability of the group to help. 


April 6 at the meeting, or on the Facebook group page, you will announce your project. In the months of April, May, and June you will work on it. At least monthly, update us on your progress. 


Those of you that do NaNoWriMo know there are rules for the project. In the Bayou Writers Project, you write your own rules. It could be number of hours to write, it could be word count, it could be a new project or a work in progress. It can be completed or just further along. The goal is up to you. 


The Purpose: to encourage each other, have accountability, and maybe get something done. 


The Prize: the sense of accomplishment that comes from meeting your writing goals. And, a chance to win a cool writing prize package. 


How much will this awesome opportunity cost me? Only the time it takes to finish your project and the cost of donating to the prize package if you want to. 


Note: prize will be given at the July meeting. Paid members are eligible for the prize, but two rules apply: 


1. You must be present to win. 

2. You must donate a writing related item for the prize package. 

Write-Ins & Critiques

  

Write-Ins: in some of the meetings it will be us writing. If you have something you’re currently working on you can bring it or you can go from a prompt. I will bring a box of prompts and we will draw three from them. I’ll have some already, but if you have inspirational prompts bring them to add to the box. 


Meeting Critiques: Writing is solitary, but we still like to hang out and discuss our work. On some months we will divide into small groups and discuss a current project or what you wrote in the write in. Participation is optional, but you might get bored if you don’t. 


Guidelines: 


  • double spaced, times new roman 12 point, 
  • not more than three pages. 
  • Small Groups will be divided at random in the meeting 


Personal Critiques: This is open to ACTIVE Current members


Need more help? Negotiate with someone to bring your work home with them and give further critiques. 


Guidelines:


  • bring a SASE with enough postage for the critiquer to mail it back to you
  • Not more than 3,000 words –negotiable between author/critiquer 
  • Don’t ask if you aren’t willing to also critique as well. 
  • Don’t say yes if you don’t feel called to critique. 


REMEMBER: 


A critique is not about the writer. Be kind, but also be honest and useful. 

Think of a critique like a sandwich (or hamburger if you prefer) 

Bread—what worked

Meat—what didn’t work

Add-ons---suggestions to improve

Bread—what worked. 


Sum up what you read for the author. This helps them know if you understood it the way they intended. 

Critiques are another person’s opinion. As an author, you may or may not agree with the person critiquing your work. Don’t be offended. Just take what works for you and leave the rest. 

Check out Melissa Donovan’s Article at Writing Forward for helpful hints on critiquing 

https://www.writingforward.com/writing-tips/how-to-critique

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